Tag Archives: Snap To Market

Freezing Fruit

How to Stockpile Your Produce Without the Hassle of Canning

With the outdoor farmers market season coming to an end, everyone is looking for ways to stockpile their fresh produce. To maximize your SNAP EBT benefits and utilize your farmers market produce several months from now, try preserving your produce!

The most traditional way to preserve your produce is by canning. Canning, however, can be very difficult for beginners and can be a long and tedious process. Here are three stress-free alternatives to canning that guarantee your produce’s freshness long after harvest.

  1. Freezing

Freezing is a great alternative to making jam and canning if you want your produce to be accessible in the middle of the winter. You also can do it easily in your own home with a standard freezer. You can freeze fresh fruit, vegetables, and even herbs in olive oil in an ice cube tray. Full recipes here:

How to Freeze Fresh Fruit, How to Freeze Zucchini, How to Freeze Fresh Herbs in Olive Oil

  1. Drying

Drying is another canning alternative that can preserve your best fruit. Although drying typically involves a dehydrator, it can easily be done in your own oven. Try drying your own fruit for your trail mix this fall. Full recipe here: How to Dry Fruit Without a Dehydrator

  1. Jamming

Although jamming is still done in a can, it is a much simpler process. Making jams and preserves is a great way to reuse extra fruit and can also double as a great gift. The difference between jams and preserves comes from how they are made. Jams use mashed up fruit whereas preserves use chunks of whole fruit. Full recipe here: How to Make Jams and Preserves

Check out what’s being picked this week*: Pumpkin, Cauliflower, Beets, Cabbage, Broccoli, Beans, Peppers, Eggplant, Potatoes, Winter Squash, Onions, Raspberries & Collards

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the Week:

Cozy up this fall with this seasonal soup recipe!

 

plastic containers for storing food in the fridge

How-to Keep Your Produce Fresh: Shelf-life 101

Everyone loves to enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables, but it can be difficult to keep produce fresh without spoiling. Each year, Americans dump $43 billion worth of spoiled food. To save your SNAP EBT benefits and the environment, use these tips to maximize your produce’s shelf-life and minimize waste.

Location of Produce

To lengthen the shelf-life of your produce, you must slow each food’s respiration using cold temperatures, typically using the refrigerator. Warmer temperatures speed up the rate of respiration. Some fruits release ethylene, a gas that’s speeds the rate of respiration and spoiling. To maximize your produce’s freshness:

  1. Refrigerate these ethylene releasers: Apples, Apricots, Cantaloupe, Figs, and Honeydew
  2. Do not refrigerate these ethylene releasers: Pears, Plums, and Tomatoes
  3. Keep these away from ethylene releasers: Broccoli, Brussel Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Cucumbers, Eggplant, Lettuce and other leafy greens, Parsley, Peas, Peppers, Squash Sweet Potatoes, and Watermelon

Always make sure to never store produce in airtight bags or containers, lack of air flow accelerates decay.

Secret Tips

Specific fruits and vegetables last the longest when stored in particular ways. For example, berries last longer when rinsed in a one-part vinegar, three-part water mixture. Some other tricks to fresh produce are:

  • Store lettuce in a bowl with a paper towel and a dash of salt. The paper towel and salt absorbs the moisture and wetness from the lettuce
  • Store carrots in a bowl of water and seal with plastic wrap to keep them moist
  • Wrap onions in pantyhose to allow the right amount of air to circulate to keep the vegetable fresh
  • Store apples with potatoes to keep your potatoes from sprouting
  • Soak apple slices in salt water to prevent them from browning
  • Wrap celery in aluminum foil to allow ethylene to escape

What to Eat First

Although storing your fruits with the correct vegetables and following these secret tips help lengthen your produce’s shelf-life, you still must eat more perishable produce first. Delicate fruits such as raspberries are never going to last regardless of your storing techniques. Follow this guide to know how to prioritize your produce:

Eat on Day 0 – Day 2: Artichokes, Asparagus, Basil, Broccoli, Cherries, Corn, Dill, Green beans, Mushrooms, Mustard greens, Strawberries, and Watercress

Eat on Day 3 – Day 5: Arugula, Cucumbers, Eggplant, Grapes, Lettuce, Lime, and Zucchini

Eat on Day 6 – Day 7: Apricots, Bell peppers, Blueberries, Brussel sprouts, Cauliflower, Grapefruit, Leeks, Lemons, Mint, Oranges, Oregano, Parsley, Pears, Plums, Spinach, Tomatoes, and Watermelon

Eat on Day 8+: Apples, Beets, Cabbage, Carrots, Celery, Garlic, Onions, Potatoes, and Winter squash

Check out what’s being picked this week*: Grapes, Kale, Apples, Brussel Sprouts, Beets, Cabbage, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Tomatoes, Herbs, Peppers, Eggplant, Potatoes, Squash, Sweet Corn, Raspberries, Okra & Collards

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the Week:

Looking for a last minute side dish for dinner tonight? Try this recipe!

 

Fredonia Farmer's Market

New York State Farmers Market Profile: Fredonia Farmers Market

The Fredonia Farmers Market came into existence fourteen years ago when three artists began showing their artwork in an old parking lot. Soon the idea grew and relocated to the center of historic downtown Fredonia. It has since become a signature stop for both residents and tourists alike. Once a week during the summer local farmers, food producers, and artisans bring you locally produced foods, delicious treats and crafts. It’s family-friendly atmosphere and weekly events make it a great way for everyone, young and old, to spend the day. Here is everything you need to know about the Fredonia Farmers Market.

Market hours

The Fredonia Farmers Market runs from the month of May through the month of October on every Saturday from 9am – 1pm.

Where are we located?

It is located on Church Street (Barkers Commons) directly in front of the 1891 Fredonia Opera House.

Do we accept EBT SNAP benefits?

Yes! Look for our “Use Your SNAP Benefits Card to Get Tokens Here” banner at our center market table. Someone will be there to assist you in purchasing your SNAP benefit tokens. Once you have purchased your tokens they can be used to buy fruits, vegetables, plants that produce food, breads, meat, fish, poultry, dairy products, maple and honey products, seeds for plants that produce food, baked goods intended for home consumption, jams, sauces, and soups. EBT customers will also have access to our SNAP Navigator, an onsite staff person who can help guide customers in maximizing their EBT benefits.

What is available at the Fredonia Farmers Market? 

The market hosts about 35 vendors each week. Customers will have access to the best fruits and vegetables from Fred Farms, Feinen Farms, Small Meadows Farm, Gong Garden, and Garden Gate Greenhouse. Some of our other local farms such as Avid Farm, Roo Haven Farm, and Someday Maybe Farm offer sustainably grown beef, lamb, chicken, turkey, eggs, and cheeses. It is our mission to increase the awareness of and promote Chautauqua County’s family farms as well as businesses and products that are the foundation for our local economy.

What else do we offer?

Whether it is the weekly free pancake breakfast, market-sponsored musicians, concerts in the park, cooking demonstrations, tot yoga, children’s programming, an ice cream social or other activities, there seems to always be something for everyone. If you’re in the Western New York region come check out the Fredonia Farmers Market this weekend!

What’s being picked this week: Kale, Apples, Brussel Sprouts, Beets, Cabbage, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Tomatoes, Herbs, Peppers, Lima Beans, Eggplant, Potatoes, Sweet Corn, Squash, Blueberries, Pears, Raspberries, Okra, Collards

Recipes: A Fall Flavor Favorite (http://juliasalbum.com/2015/10/roasted-brussels-sprouts-cinnamon-butternut-squash-pecans-and-cranberries/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Potatoes at Farmers market

One Potato, Two Potatoes, Bad Potato, Good?

Did you know that potatoes are actually good for you? Sadly, most people assume they aren’t good for them and with good reason. The truth is America’s obsession with junk food is to blame for potatoes getting a bad rap. According to the USDA/NASS approximately 65% of the potatoes consumed in the United States per year are in French Fry or Potato Chip form. Obviously, when you fry or process a potato and add fatty oils and high levels of sodium to them it’s going to do more harm than good.

Nutrition experts are trying to dispel the unhealthy potato myth by educating the public about the nutritional benefits of the potato. One medium baked potato gives us almost 30% or our daily-recommended value of both vitamin B6 and vitamin C. Potatoes are also high in both fiber and potassium which most of us do not get enough of on a daily basis. A baked potato is an excellent addition to a well-balanced meal if you go easy on the sodium and fatty toppings.

By now most of us are aware that we don’t have to sacrifice taste when it comes to eating healthy. Some alternative healthy toppings that go great on a baked potato are scallions, Greek yogurt, curry, tomato-pesto, salsa, low fat sour cream and chives. Can’t imagine your spud without butter and salt? Just remember less is more.

Don’t discard the skins. Eat them! Potato skins are packed with potassium, iron, and niacin. What does that mean for you? Potassium fuels your metabolism and assists in your muscle movement. Iron supports healthy red blood cells, which carry oxygen throughout your body. And Niacin or vitamin B3 is important for healthy new cell development and assists in recovering from stress.

Recently, the Institute of Medicine put white potatoes back on the eligibility list for the WIC program. They discovered that women and children weren’t meeting the recommended daily intake of starchy vegetables and potatoes are a simple and beneficial solution.

For all of you spud fans it’s time to bring the potato back into your diet. Remember, the potato on its own is healthy, just be aware of how it’s been prepared and what’s on top of it.

Check out what’s being picked this week*: Raspberries, Okra, Beets, Cabbage, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Herbs, Peppers, Lima Beans, Eggplant, Potatoes, Squash, Sweet Corn, Blueberries, Pears

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the Week:

Here’s a great way to load up your baked potato without the added fat and calories: Try this recipe

Photo Credit: Nick Saltmarsh Via Flickr Creative Commons

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farmers Market

What the Farmers Market Means to Me: A Farmer’s Point of View

I am up before the local morning news begins. I don’t commute in morning traffic. I don’t punch a time card. I don’t have a boss checking his watch when I arrive at work. I don’t show up at an office wearing expensive suits. I don’t have an IT department to call when something goes wrong in fact most of my co-workers walk on four legs.

I am a farmer. My family depends on me and you depend on me. No time for sick days or sleeping in. I don’t do my job for the pay or notoriety I do it to fulfill my passion for the land, growing, and agriculture. Without that passion I could not do it. My job is hard but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

One of my favorite days of the week is the day I show up at your local Farmers Market. I can’t wait to show you the beautiful beets, berries or broccoli I just harvested. I look forward to our conversations about what’s in season and the best way to prepare or preserve your produce.

In an era where fast food is prevalent I am proud to make you aware of nutritious and delicious options.

I chuckle when I hear the phrase farm to table. I’ve been doing that for years! I’m excited that our country is seeing the value in farm fresh food and that eating organic is trendy. I want you to be healthy. I want you to reap the benefits of my labor. I love the opportunity to present it to you personally.

I’m thankful that SNAP Benefits are accepted at local Farmers Markets. I believe everyone should have access to farm fresh food. I love witnessing all families enjoying the opportunity to spend a beautiful day at the market, watching children pick out the vegetables they will eat for dinner that night, and knowing that I have helped that family to eat good tasting and healthy local food.

If I’ve never met you at the Farmers Market I invite you to come see me soon. Between my fellow vendors and myself there is something for everyone. I can almost guarantee it will change your perception of grocery shopping and what it means to buy local. I look forward to meeting you and I thank you in advance for supporting me, your local farmer.

What’s being picked this week: Pears, Beets, Cabbage, Kale, Lettuce, Swiss Chard, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Herbs, Peppers, Lima Beans, Eggplant, Potatoes, Squash, Sweet Corn, Blueberries

Recipes: Looking for a healthy snack? Try these salsas! http://www.countryliving.com/food-drinks/a5299/homemade-salsa-recipes-cosmo/

Photo Credit: United Soybean Board Via Flickr Creative Commons

Cucumber Recipe

Be Cool this Summer with Cucumber Facts: The Basics on Preparing and Storing Cucumbers

 

When shopping at your local farmers market this summer with your EBT SNAP benefits, impress your friends and family with your cucumber knowledge. Read below to become an expert on everything cucumbers, from preparing them to storing them.

What is a Cucumber?

Cucumbers are the fourth most widely cultivated “vegetable” in the world. Technically, cucumbers are fruits because they grow from the ovaries of flowering plants, but most people still refer to them as vegetables. Cucumbers can come in a variety of shapes, colors and sizes. They fall into two main categories: slicing cucumbers and pickling cucumbers. Slicing cucumbers are intended for fresh consumption and pickling cucumbers are intended to be pickled.

Health Benefits of Cucumbers

Cucumbers are 90% water and contain multiple health benefits. They contain vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin B5 and valuable minerals including manganese, potassium, and magnesium. Three types of phytonutrients (flavonoids, lignans, and triterpenes) can also be found in cucumbers which provide anti-inflammatory benefits.

Picking the Perfect Cucumber

When looking for the perfect cucumber at the farmers market, check for firmness. A cucumber should be firm, rounded on the edges, and medium to dark green in color. Stay away from yellow puffy cucumbers or ones with bruised areas. If you’re not a fan of seeds in your cucumbers, look for thin-skinned cucumbers which have less seeds.

Preparing Cucumbers

Slicing cucumbers are best served fresh and raw, but they can also be sautéed, fried, or even mixed in drinks. Cucumbers contain most of their nutrients in their seeds and their skin. It is advised, from a nutritional standpoint, to eat cucumbers with both. However, cucumbers have wax coatings on their skin. Organically grown cucumbers have non-synthetic waxes where conventionally grown cucumbers may have synthetic waxes and pesticides. If you choose to eat the skin, buy organic cucumbers to eliminate the risk of synthetic wax consumption. If buying organic is not an option, then thoroughly wash each cucumber with a brush or simply remove the skin before eating.

Pickling Cucumbers

Pickling cucumbers are designed to be pickled. Pickling refers to a method of preserving goods by soaking them in a liquid. The basic type of pickling is fermenting which is when cucumbers soak in varying solutions for an extended period of time. It is very easy to pickle your cucumbers at home. Pickling kits are typically sold at grocery stores.

Storing Cucumbers

To maximize your cucumbers’ freshness, store them at room temperature. Cucumbers are very sensitive to the sun so keep them out of direct sunlight or heat. Cucumbers are also highly reactive to ethylene, a plant hormone which initiates ripening in fruits and vegetables. To prevent this process from affecting your cucumbers, store them away from bananas, melons and tomatoes.

Check out what is being picked this week*:

Rhubarb, Beets, Cabbage, Kale, Lettuce, Swiss Chard, Onions, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Cherries, Raspberries, Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Herbs, Blackberries, Peppers, Lima Beans, Eggplant, Potatoes, Peaches & Nectarines

 

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the Week:

Go Greek with this cucumber summer salad recipe!

 

 

Clinton Farmers Market

New York State Farmers Market Profile: Clinton Farmers Market

The Clinton Farmers Market is one of the largest markets in the Mohawk Valley region. It started twenty years ago with only a few vendors and now has over seventy! The location of the Clinton Farmers Market provides the picturesque farmers market setting for visitors. It’s bustling activity and occasional live music make it a great place to spend the day with family and friends. Learn more about about this spotlight farmers market and how you can use your EBT SNAP benefits.

When is it open?

The market runs on Thursdays from May 23 through October 6 from 10am – 4pm with extended hours on the third Thursday of each month from 10am – 6pm.

Where is it?

The market is located in the historic center of Clinton, NY on the Village Green. It central location is walking distance from many areas in town including the Clinton Central High School. A shuttle is provided by LutheranCare from Clinton Elementary School in July from 11 am-1pm. Hamilton College provides a Jitney Service from campus to the Village Green from 11am-1pm.

Does the market accept EBT SNAP Benefits?

The Clinton Farmers Market accepts EBT SNAP benefits. Look for the information tent at the market under the “Use Your SNAP Benefits Card to Get Tokens Here” banner. Shoppers can use their EBT SNAP benefits to purchase tokens at the manager’s booth. Tokens can be used farmers’ stands Your tokens can buy fruits, vegetables, plants that produce food, breads, meat, fish, poultry, dairy products, maple and honey products, seeds for plants that produce food, baked goods intended for home consumption, jams, sauces, and soups. 

What is for sale at the market?

The market has over 70 vendors from across the Mohawk Valley. They sell locally grown fruits, vegetables, fresh-cut and dried flowers, jams, jellies, meats and cheeses, maple syrup, honey, baked goods, and much more.  There is also a selection of handmade arts & crafts items including beautiful watercolor paintings, jewelry, clothing, and many other interesting items for sale.

What makes the Clinton Farmers Market so special?

The Clinton Farmers Market is a very community oriented and family friendly market. It welcomes all visitors, locally and those from out-of-town. It’s upbeat atmosphere and live music in the gazebo make it the perfect place to spend an afternoon. Clinton Farmers Market also offers free booth space to non-profit, charitable organizations to support the local Clinton community.

For more information on the Clinton Farmers Market, visit their website at http://clintonnychamber.org/farmers-market.html.

Check out what is being picked this week*:

Potatoes, Rhubarb, Beets, Cabbage, Kale, Lettuce, Swiss Chard, Onions, Snap Peas, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Cherries, Raspberries, Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Herbs, Blackberries & Peppers

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the week:

Try this healthy twist on a traditional Italian dish: Eggplant Parmesan!

Getting Kids To Eat Their Vegetables

Getting Your Kids to Eat Vegetable

As an adult, going to the farmers market and picking out fresh and local vegetables with your EBT SNAP benefits card is exciting. Unfortunately, your children may not be as enthused. If your child is a picky eater, it can be challenge to get them to eat healthy. Make the most of your farmers market produce and try these tips and recipes to get your kids to eat healthy foods!

  1. Get them cooking

If your children are involved in the food preparation process, from start to finish, they will be more inclined to eat the healthy dish. Take them to the farmers market and help them pick out the produce. Cooking together will not only be a quality experience but it will make your child feel involved and proud of the finished product.

  1. Pair vegetables with their favorite foods

Children will be more willing to try a new vegetable if it’s paired with their favorite food. Try adding vegetable toppings to a pizza or taco or mix in vegetables with a pasta dish. If your child is resistant, don’t give up. Your child’s taste preferences will change as they grow. It could be helpful to serve a familiar vegetable with a new one so your child will be more likely to eat them.

  1. Don’t force your child to eat vegetables

Although it is frustrating when your child will not eat their vegetables, it is not productive to yell or make ultimatums. DO NOT force your child to eat any food. This can cause emotional trauma surrounding the food and have them avoid eating it, even as adults. The best strategy is to ask them to eat small portions of the food to try, not clean their plate.

  1. Put them everywhere

When children are hungry, they usually pick what is easy and accessible. Your job as a parent is to make fruits and vegetables reachable snacks. Cut them up and put them in containers on low shelves in the fridge. If healthy snacks are already cut and ready to eat, your children will be more likely to choose them. Also, have snack-sized dips like hummus or ranch available to pair with raw vegetables.

  1. Set a good example

Children mimic their parents’ behavior. If they see you eating healthy foods, they will eat them as well. Eat the foods you are asking them to eat and be a role model for them. Teach them about healthy foods and nutrition and they will most likely adopt your ways.

If none of these tips work on your picky eater, try hiding vegetables in plain sight. Check out this website with over 100+ recipes kids will enjoy but secretly contain vegetables.

Check out what is being picked this week*:

Tomatoes, Herbs, Blackberries, Peppers, Lima Beans, Rhubarb, Beets, Cabbage, Kale, Lettuce, Swiss Chard, Onions, Snap Peas, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Cherries, Raspberries & Cucumbers

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the Week:

If your child is a chicken nugget fanatic, try this recipe for veggie nuggets. It may just get them to eat their vegetables.

Grilling Vegetables

Summer Time is Grilling Time: Tips to Grill Vegetables to Perfection

Once you’ve purchased your locally grown vegetables with your EBT SNAP card, the question becomes how should you cook them? The best way to eat vegetables in the summer is to grill them. Not only can you enjoy the summer weather and cook outside, but it can be done in less than 30 minutes. To grill to perfection this summer follow these tips:

  1. Know them.

Some vegetables are grown for the grill, while others do not fare so well. It is important to know which vegetables are best for the grill and how long they take to cook. Asparagus, corn, eggplant, mushrooms, peppers, onions and cabbage are great grilling vegetables. Squash, tomatoes, potatoes, zucchini, and even romaine work well on the grill as well but beware of their cooking times. Denser vegetables like potatoes will take much longer where tomatoes grill quickly. Make sure to avoid grilling cucumbers, celery, and most leafy greens. Their high water content makes them hard to grill.

  1. Coat them.

When grilling vegetables, it is important to always coat them in cooking oil or marinade. Without oil, the vegetables will dry up when heated. Before grilling, make sure to toss your vegetables lightly in cooking oil or marinade and add some seasoning for flavor. Avoid adding too much because dripping oil can cause flare-ups and off flavors. The correct amount of cooking oil or marinade will keep your vegetables tender and help the seasoning stick.

  1. Cut them.

To minimize grill time, you want to make sure your vegetables have the most surface area touching the grill. Cut your larger vegetables in decent-sized chunks to maximize surface area. You don’t want to cut them too small or they will fall through the grill. Cutting your vegetables to similar thicknesses will also help them cook more evenly. Another tip to cooking vegetables more evenly is to separate your dense and delicate vegetables. Individually, sear each grouping over high heat then move them to a cooler part of the grill to finish cooking.

  1. Kabob them.

Sometimes you can’t cut your vegetables into decent-sized pieces. Small vegetables like cherry tomatoes are prone to rolling around on the grill. To prevent them from falling, use a skewer and make kabobs with other small vegetables. Smaller pieces cook must faster than larger pieces on the grill. Placing your vegetables on a skewer is the best way to grill vegetables quick.

  1. Place them.

If your vegetables are too big for a skewer, use a grilling pan. A grilling pan is the perfect tool to keep vegetables from burning. Separate your dense and delicate vegetables in individual pans to account for varying cooking times. Watch each pan closely until the desired tenderness is reached. Remember, denser vegetables will take much longer to cook. If you do not have a grilling pan, aluminum foil can work as well to form small grilling baskets.

Now you’re ready to get grilling! Put your grilling skills to the test and try this recipe for Balsamic Grilled Vegetable Salad.

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Check out what is being picked this week*:

Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Cherries, Raspberries, Rhubarb, Beets, Cabbage, Cucumbers, Kale, Lettuce, Swiss Chard, Scallions & Snap Peas

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the week:

Cherries are more than an Ice Cream Sundae Topper. Check out this cherry-filled sweet summer snack!

 

 

 

kale

What’s the deal with Kale?

 A breakdown of the trending vegetable and its nutritional benefits

Looking for nutritious vegetables to purchase at your local farmers’ market with your EBT SNAP card? Look no further– Kale is the answer. Kale is a leafy green that has been a trending vegetable for the past fifteen years. The previously unknown vegetable has now become a well-known superfood. Kale is much more than a member of the cabbage family, its nutritional benefits and low cost, make it the perfect vegetable for every family.

Learn more about kale with these super facts:

  • Kale is one of the most nutrient dense foods on the planet because it is low in calories and high in nutrients.
  • Kale is packed with antioxidants and is an excellent source of calcium and iron.
  • One cup of raw kale contains:
    • 33 calories
    • 134% of your daily vitamin C needs
    • 684% of your daily vitamin K needs
    • 204% of vitamin A
    • 10% of your daily fiber needs
  • Kale is a member of the cruciferous vegetable family which includes broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage, arugula, and collard greens.
  • It is one of the simplest crops for local farmers to grow and thrives in small plots of land and personal gardens.
  • Kale has its own holiday. National Kale Day is celebrated each year in October.
  • There are over 50 varieties of Kale some include Lacinato, Redbor, True Siberian, Red Russian, White Russian, Dwarf Blue Vates, Chinese Kale, Sea Kale, and Walking Stick Kale.
  • Kale can be prepared in a variety of ways: sautéed, cooked, baked, blended, and tossed and has the same nutritional benefits cooked and raw.
  • Kale is a great source of carotenoids, which are linked to optimism levels.
  • Kale has been cultivated for over 6000 years.
  • Kale is harvested and available at NYS farmers’ markets* from June to December. Purchase Kale at your local farmers’ market with your EBT SNAP card.

Looking to cook with this popular vegetable? Try this “kale-ever” twist on pesto with this recipe.

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Check out what is being picked this week*:

Scallions, Snap Peas, Rhubarb, Beets, Cabbage, Kale, Lettuce, Swiss Chard & Peas

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the week:

Looking for a perfect veggie-packed summer salad with a kick of spice? Try it here.