Category Archives: Apples

apples

Apple Time in New York!

applesEach year, New York State’s nearly 700 apple orchards produce 29.5 million bushels of apples! You see them at your farmers markets — baskets of red, yellow, and green fruit, two dozen different varieties. Among the most popular are Empire, McIntosh, Golden Delicious, Cortland, and Gala. With all the options to choose from, how do you know which ones to use for pies and which kind makes the best eating? This is a great time for you to talk with the growers at the market about their recommendations!

To help you with that conversation, here’s a guide  from the New York Apple Association:

Braeburns are a little like Granny Smiths, with a sweet, yet tangy flavor. They are excellent for cooking and they hold up well in cold storage. Look for these to be available late in September and early October.

Cortland is an all-purpose apple and a true New Yorker — it was developed at the NYS Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, New York in 1898! It’s juicy and sweet, with just a bit of tartness. Its flesh stays white after cutting, so it’s excellent for use in salads. Use Cortlands for sauce, baking, and pies; slice and freeze now for baking over the winter months.

Crispins were first grown in Japan and were introduced in New York in 1948. A cross between Golden Delicious and Indo apples, they are crunchy, excellent for eating, making apple sauce, and baking.

Idareds may have been developed in Idaho, but it’s a cross between two apples that were first grown in New York’s Finger Lakes region in 1791. Use them for all kinds of cooking — sauce, baking, cooking, and pies. Idareds look as good as they taste, as they hold their shape and look beautiful in bowls on counters and table centerpieces.

McIntosh are a long-time favorite. It’s great for eating and because it has a tender flesh, it cooks down quickly for a great apple sauce.

Baking Tips:

  • Blend tart and sweet apple varieties for great pies with a variety of textures.
  • Keep slices uniform in size for pies and crisps for even baking; chop smaller piece for breads and muffins.
  • 1 pound of apples – 2 large, 3 medium, 4 or 5 small; 3 cups peeled and sliced apples

Classic Apple pie recipe from New York Apple Association’s website: www.nyapplecountry.com

For 8 people, a two-crust, 9-inch pie

Ingredients

  • 6 cups New York State apples thinly sliced and peeled
  • 1/4 cup of sugar
  • 2 tablespoon(s) flour
  • 3/4 teaspoon(s) cinnamon
  • 1/4 teaspoon(s) salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon(s) nutmeg
  • 1 tablespoon(s) lemon juice

Combine all filling ingredients in a large bowl. Mix lightly.

Heat oven to 425º.

Use your favorite pie crust whether it’s a treasured family recipe or the quick and easy refrigerated pie crusts available in the supermarket.

  • Prepare pie crust and place crust in pie pan, pressing firmly against sides and bottom.
  • Trim crust evenly with the pan edge.
  • Fill pie crust and place second crust over filling.
  • Wrap excess top crust under the bottom crust edge. Press edges together to seal and flute.
  • Cut slits in top crust. Cover edge of crust with strips of foil for the first 25 minutes of baking.
  • Bake for 40-45 minutes or until crust is golden brown

 

Photo Credit: Hans Via Pixabay

 

Southampton Farmer's Market

Southampton Farmer’s Market

Southampton Farmer's MarketThe Southampton Farmers’ Market is a program of the Southampton Chamber of Commerce.

When is the market open? Sundays May 28th through October 8th from 9am to 2pm

Where is the market located? east side Grounds of the Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton NY 11968

Does the market accept EBT SNAP Benefits? Yes, EBT cards are accepted.

What do the vendors sell? A selection of locally grown produce and fruits, baked goods, yogurt, pickles and wine.

For more information about the Southampton Farmers’ Market, please visit their Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/SouthamptonFarmersMarket/

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Check out what is being picked this week*:

Tomatoes, (round, grape, cherry), Beans, Cucumbers, Pickles, Hot peppers, Sweet Bell Peppers, Onions, Eggplant, Beets, Lettuces, Greens, Beets, Cabbages, Sweet Corn, Potatoes, Zucchini, Yellow Squash, Broccoli, Carrots, Blueberries, Cherries, Peaches, Cantaloupe, Watermelon, Leeks, Cauliflower, Early Apples

*Availability will vary by market, due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the week: Sweet Corn and Tomato Salad

http://snaptomarket.com/?recipe=sweet-corn-and-tomato-salad

 

 

 

Troy Waterfront

Troy Waterfront Farmer’s Market

Troy WaterfrontTroy Waterfront Farmers’ Market was established in 2000 with just a handful of vendors. Now in its 18th season, the market features over 80 local, producer-only vendors. The year-round marketplace attracts more than 10,000 customers a week.

What is it? Troy Waterfront Farmers’ is a year-round, independent, vibrant marketplace featuring locally grown food and locally made products for the mutual benefit of local producers, consumers, and the community.

When does it open? Troy Waterfront Farmers’ Market is open year-round every Saturday from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Where is it located? Troy Waterfront Farmers’ Market holds its Summer Season is May – October at Monument Square in downtown Troy. The Winter season is November – April in the Troy Atrium, 49 4th Street, Troy, NY.

Does the market accept EBT SNAP Benefits? Troy Waterfront Farmers’ Market accepts EBT SNAP benefits, including MNP checks.

What do the vendors sell? Vendors at Troy Waterfront Farmers’ Market sell all locally-grown or produced fruits and vegetables, garden plants and flowers, cheeses, honey, eggs and dairy products and much more!

What makes the Troy Waterfront Farmers Market special? This market is 100% farmers only. There is no reselling of products. So when you visit this market you can meet the farmers, ask questions and learn more about how your food is grown, how to choose the right products for your family and learn how to prepare the foods you purchase – all straight from the experts themselves, the farmers!

For more information on the Troy Waterfront Farmers Market, please visit their website: https://www.troymarket.org/

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Check out what is being picked this week*:

Tomatoes, (round, grape, cherry), Beans, Cucumbers, Pickles, Hot peppers, Sweet Bell Peppers, Onions, Eggplant, Beets, Lettuces, Greens, Beets, Cabbages, Sweet Corn, Potatoes, Zucchini, Yellow Squash, Broccoli, Carrots, Blueberries, Cherries, Peaches, Cantaloupe, Watermelon, Leeks, Cauliflower, Early Apples

*Availability will vary by market, due to differences in growing zones.

 

Recipe of the week: Sweet Corn and Tomato Salad

http://snaptomarket.com/?recipe=sweet-corn-and-tomato-salad

 

 

 

 

 

Queens Botanical

Queens Botanical Garden Farmer’s Market

Queens BotanicalQueens Botanical Garden is an urban oasis where people, plants and cultures are celebrated through inspiring gardens and innovative educational programs. The Queens Botanical Garden Farmers Market celebrates locally grown fruits and vegetables, brought to the neighborhood straight from the farm! It is one of 15 farmers’ markets operated by the Down to Earth company. Down to Earth Markets has been creating and managing farmers markets in down state New York for over 25 years. We bring cooks and eaters together with regional farmers and local food makers to create food communities, improving access to fresh, local foods, strengthening the local food system and supporting small businesses in the New York area.

When is the market open? Market open Fridays, 8:30AM – 3:00PM, 06/16 – 11/17

 Where is the market located? Sidewalk outside Garden – Dahlia Ave at Main St. in Flushing, NY.

 Does the market accept EBT SNAP benefits?  Yes, and to encourage you to use your SNAP card, we offer Health Bucks. Health Bucks are $2 coupons that you receive for every $5 you spend from your SNAP card; you can use the health bucks to buy more fresh fruits and vegetables at the farmers’ market.

What do the vendors sell? Vendors offer a wide variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, fish, meats, dairy; baked goods, specialty foods and plants and flowers; jams & jelly, salad dressings, sauces & salsa, olive oil, chutneys, frozen soups, chocolate, pickles as well as prepared ethnic foods.

For more information about the Queens Botanical Garden Farmers’ Market, please visit the website at:  http://downtoearthmarkets.com/markets?region=Queens&market=Queens+Botanical+Garden+Farmers+Market and their Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=queens%20botanical%20garden%20farmers%20market

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Check out what is being picked this week*:

Tomatoes, (round, grape, cherry), Beans, Cucumbers, Pickles, Hot peppers, Sweet Bell Peppers, Onions, Eggplant, Beets, Lettuces, Greens, Beets, Cabbages, Sweet Corn, Potatoes, Zucchini, Yellow Squash, Broccoli, Carrots, Blueberries, Cherries, Peaches, Cantaloupe, Watermelon, Leeks, Cauliflower, Early Apples

*Availability will vary by market, due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the week: Sweet Corn and Tomato Salad

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Rhinebeck

Rhinebeck Farmer’s Market

RhinebeckEntering our 23rd season, the Rhinebeck Farmers’ Market is one of the largest producer only markets in the Hudson Valley. The market has become Rhinebeck’s Sunday morning gathering place, a place where neighbors meet and mingle and visitors can sample the very best of the Hudson Valley.

When does it open?  May 14 – Nov. 19: every Sunday, 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., rain or shine!  Winter market: December through April

Where is the market located:  Outdoor Market- 61 East Market St., Rhinebeck, NY. Indoor Market:  80 East Market St. Rhinebeck, NY

Does the market accept EBT SNAP Benefits? Yes! We launched EBT SNAP last season! In addition, SNAP shoppers can increase their buying power with Fresh Connect checks — $2.00 incentive checks for every $5.00 in SNAP benefits spent.

What do the vendors sell? A diverse and unique selection of farm fresh products including fruits and vegetables, beef, pork, lamb, venison, buffalo, fish, chicken, turkey, duck, pheasant, and rabbit; eggs from chicken, duck, turkey and pheasant; goat, cow and sheep’s milk cheeses; dairy; honey; juices; jams; flowers and plants; smoked products and much more.

What special events do you have at the market? Kid’s Day with T-shirt Painting on Aug. 27; Kid’s tour of the market and cooking demo with Chef Josh Kroner of Terrapin Restaurant; Kid’s Pumpkin Painting on Oct. 29.

What makes the market special? The Rhinebeck Farmers’ Market is unique in that it is not supported by a civic or governmental organization and enjoys no special eligibility status. The market relies solely upon vendor fees, business sponsors, donations, volunteers and merchandise sales for its operating funds.

For more information on the Rhinebeck Farmers’ Market, please visit their website at: http://www.rhinebeckfarmersmarket.com/ and Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/RhinebeckFarmersMarket/

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Check out what is being picked this week*:

Tomatoes, (round, grape, cherry), Beans, Cucumbers, Pickles, Hot peppers, Sweet Bell Peppers, Onions, Eggplant, Beets, Lettuces, Greens, Beets, Cabbages, Sweet Corn, Potatoes, Zucchini, Yellow Squash, Broccoli, Carrots, Blueberries, Cherries, Peaches, Cantaloupe, Watermelon, Leeks, Cauliflower, Early Apples

*Availability will vary by market, due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the week: Sweet Corn and Tomato Salad

Home

 

 

 

 

Jamaica Saturday Market

Jamaica Saturday Farmer’s Market

Jamaica Saturday MarketThis year marks the 43rd season of the Jamaica Friday Farmers’ Market, the longest-running farmers’ market in New York City. It offers fresh, delicious fruits and vegetables from New York area farms. It is one of 15 farmers’ markets operated by the Down to Earth company. Down to Earth Markets has been creating and managing farmer’s markets in down state New York for over 25 years. We bring cooks and eaters together with regional farmers and local food makers to create food communities, improving access to fresh, local foods, strengthening the local food system and supporting small businesses in the New York area.

When is the market open? Market open Saturdays, 8:30AM – 4:00PM, 06/17 – 11/18

Where is the market located? 160th St. off Jamaica Ave, Queens, NY

Does the market accept EBT SNAP benefits?  Yes, and to encourage you to use your SNAP card, we offer Health Bucks. Health Bucks are $2 coupons that you receive for every $5 you spend from your SNAP card; you can use the health bucks to buy more fresh fruits and vegetables at the farmers’ market.

What do the vendors sell? Vendors offer a wide variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, fish, meats, dairy; baked goods, specialty foods and plants and flowers; jams & jelly, salad dressings, sauces & salsa, olive oil, chutneys, frozen soups, chocolate, pickles as well as prepared ethnic foods.

Special Events: The Annual Harvest Festival will be held on October 21, 2017 from 11am – 4pm.

For more information about the Jamaica Saturday Farmers’ Market, please visit the website at:  http://downtoearthmarkets.com/markets?region=Queens&market=Jamaica+Farmers+Market+Saturday and their Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/downtoearthmarketsjamaica/

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Check out what is being picked this week*:
Tomatoes, (round, grape, cherry), Beans, Cucumbers, Pickles, Hot peppers, Sweet Bell Peppers, Onions, Eggplant, Beets, Lettuces, Greens, Beets, Cabbages, Sweet Corn, Potatoes, Zucchini, Yellow Squash, Broccoli, Carrots, Blueberries, Cherries, Peaches, Cantaloupe, Watermelon, Leeks, Cauliflower, Early Apples

*Availability will vary by market, due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the week: Sweet Corn and Tomato Salad

http://snaptomarket.com/?recipe=sweet-corn-and-tomato-salad

 

 

 

 

 

Snap To Market

How to Use Your SNAP Benefits at the Farmers Market

Having farm fresh produce available on a weekly basis is an excellent resource for maintaining a healthier lifestyle. Much like our grocery stores Farmers Markets are becoming more and more accessible to everyone. Thanks to the Farmers Market SNAP Benefit program all EBT cardholders are able to purchase goods and produce at participating Farmers Markets. If you’re a cardholder here is what you can expect when you head out to your local Farmers Market.

When you first arrive look for a table with a banner that reads “Use Your EBT Card Here”. Hand your card to the cashier and purchase as many $1 tokens as you need. While shopping look for the market booths with an “EBT Tokens Accepted Here” sign. You do not have to use all of your tokens in one shopping trip. Unused tokens can either be refunded back onto your card or you can use them the next time you shop at your Farmers Market. Keep in mind that the tokens are market-specific and cannot be transferred between markets.

The overall experience of being at a Farmers Market is more enjoyable and the selection is always fresh and unique. What can you buy with your tokens? You can purchase everything from fruits and vegetables to fresh baked bread and dairy products. Sometimes meats, fish, and poultry are also available making it easy to plan dinner that night.

It’s not a bad idea to take note of your favorite venders so you can go back and spend time with them during your next visit. The farmers and vendors are always willing to share recipes and preparation tips with their customers. They can keep you informed on what’s in season and what will be in the future. Making it more about the experience is beneficial to both you and the vendors. So take your time and enjoy!

What’s being picked this week: Grapes, Beets, Cabbage, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Peppers, Eggplant, Potatoes, Winter Squash, Onions, Raspberries, Collards, Kale, Apples, Brussel Sprouts

Recipes: Looking for a way to make your lunch exciting? (http://www.honeyandbirch.com/grilled-chicken-salad-lettuce-wraps/)

Photo Credit: Patrick Kuhl Via Flickr Creative Commons

plastic containers for storing food in the fridge

How-to Keep Your Produce Fresh: Shelf-life 101

Everyone loves to enjoy fresh fruits and vegetables, but it can be difficult to keep produce fresh without spoiling. Each year, Americans dump $43 billion worth of spoiled food. To save your SNAP EBT benefits and the environment, use these tips to maximize your produce’s shelf-life and minimize waste.

Location of Produce

To lengthen the shelf-life of your produce, you must slow each food’s respiration using cold temperatures, typically using the refrigerator. Warmer temperatures speed up the rate of respiration. Some fruits release ethylene, a gas that’s speeds the rate of respiration and spoiling. To maximize your produce’s freshness:

  1. Refrigerate these ethylene releasers: Apples, Apricots, Cantaloupe, Figs, and Honeydew
  2. Do not refrigerate these ethylene releasers: Pears, Plums, and Tomatoes
  3. Keep these away from ethylene releasers: Broccoli, Brussel Sprouts, Cabbage, Carrots, Cauliflower, Cucumbers, Eggplant, Lettuce and other leafy greens, Parsley, Peas, Peppers, Squash Sweet Potatoes, and Watermelon

Always make sure to never store produce in airtight bags or containers, lack of air flow accelerates decay.

Secret Tips

Specific fruits and vegetables last the longest when stored in particular ways. For example, berries last longer when rinsed in a one-part vinegar, three-part water mixture. Some other tricks to fresh produce are:

  • Store lettuce in a bowl with a paper towel and a dash of salt. The paper towel and salt absorbs the moisture and wetness from the lettuce
  • Store carrots in a bowl of water and seal with plastic wrap to keep them moist
  • Wrap onions in pantyhose to allow the right amount of air to circulate to keep the vegetable fresh
  • Store apples with potatoes to keep your potatoes from sprouting
  • Soak apple slices in salt water to prevent them from browning
  • Wrap celery in aluminum foil to allow ethylene to escape

What to Eat First

Although storing your fruits with the correct vegetables and following these secret tips help lengthen your produce’s shelf-life, you still must eat more perishable produce first. Delicate fruits such as raspberries are never going to last regardless of your storing techniques. Follow this guide to know how to prioritize your produce:

Eat on Day 0 – Day 2: Artichokes, Asparagus, Basil, Broccoli, Cherries, Corn, Dill, Green beans, Mushrooms, Mustard greens, Strawberries, and Watercress

Eat on Day 3 – Day 5: Arugula, Cucumbers, Eggplant, Grapes, Lettuce, Lime, and Zucchini

Eat on Day 6 – Day 7: Apricots, Bell peppers, Blueberries, Brussel sprouts, Cauliflower, Grapefruit, Leeks, Lemons, Mint, Oranges, Oregano, Parsley, Pears, Plums, Spinach, Tomatoes, and Watermelon

Eat on Day 8+: Apples, Beets, Cabbage, Carrots, Celery, Garlic, Onions, Potatoes, and Winter squash

Check out what’s being picked this week*: Grapes, Kale, Apples, Brussel Sprouts, Beets, Cabbage, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Tomatoes, Herbs, Peppers, Eggplant, Potatoes, Squash, Sweet Corn, Raspberries, Okra & Collards

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the Week:

Looking for a last minute side dish for dinner tonight? Try this recipe!