Category Archives: Farmers Markets

Snap To Market

How to Use Your SNAP Benefits at the Farmers Market

Having farm fresh produce available on a weekly basis is an excellent resource for maintaining a healthier lifestyle. Much like our grocery stores Farmers Markets are becoming more and more accessible to everyone. Thanks to the Farmers Market SNAP Benefit program all EBT cardholders are able to purchase goods and produce at participating Farmers Markets. If you’re a cardholder here is what you can expect when you head out to your local Farmers Market.

When you first arrive look for a table with a banner that reads “Use Your EBT Card Here”. Hand your card to the cashier and purchase as many $1 tokens as you need. While shopping look for the market booths with an “EBT Tokens Accepted Here” sign. You do not have to use all of your tokens in one shopping trip. Unused tokens can either be refunded back onto your card or you can use them the next time you shop at your Farmers Market. Keep in mind that the tokens are market-specific and cannot be transferred between markets.

The overall experience of being at a Farmers Market is more enjoyable and the selection is always fresh and unique. What can you buy with your tokens? You can purchase everything from fruits and vegetables to fresh baked bread and dairy products. Sometimes meats, fish, and poultry are also available making it easy to plan dinner that night.

It’s not a bad idea to take note of your favorite venders so you can go back and spend time with them during your next visit. The farmers and vendors are always willing to share recipes and preparation tips with their customers. They can keep you informed on what’s in season and what will be in the future. Making it more about the experience is beneficial to both you and the vendors. So take your time and enjoy!

What’s being picked this week: Grapes, Beets, Cabbage, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Peppers, Eggplant, Potatoes, Winter Squash, Onions, Raspberries, Collards, Kale, Apples, Brussel Sprouts

Recipes: Looking for a way to make your lunch exciting? (http://www.honeyandbirch.com/grilled-chicken-salad-lettuce-wraps/)

Photo Credit: Patrick Kuhl Via Flickr Creative Commons

Fredonia Farmer's Market

New York State Farmers Market Profile: Fredonia Farmers Market

The Fredonia Farmers Market came into existence fourteen years ago when three artists began showing their artwork in an old parking lot. Soon the idea grew and relocated to the center of historic downtown Fredonia. It has since become a signature stop for both residents and tourists alike. Once a week during the summer local farmers, food producers, and artisans bring you locally produced foods, delicious treats and crafts. It’s family-friendly atmosphere and weekly events make it a great way for everyone, young and old, to spend the day. Here is everything you need to know about the Fredonia Farmers Market.

Market hours

The Fredonia Farmers Market runs from the month of May through the month of October on every Saturday from 9am – 1pm.

Where are we located?

It is located on Church Street (Barkers Commons) directly in front of the 1891 Fredonia Opera House.

Do we accept EBT SNAP benefits?

Yes! Look for our “Use Your SNAP Benefits Card to Get Tokens Here” banner at our center market table. Someone will be there to assist you in purchasing your SNAP benefit tokens. Once you have purchased your tokens they can be used to buy fruits, vegetables, plants that produce food, breads, meat, fish, poultry, dairy products, maple and honey products, seeds for plants that produce food, baked goods intended for home consumption, jams, sauces, and soups. EBT customers will also have access to our SNAP Navigator, an onsite staff person who can help guide customers in maximizing their EBT benefits.

What is available at the Fredonia Farmers Market? 

The market hosts about 35 vendors each week. Customers will have access to the best fruits and vegetables from Fred Farms, Feinen Farms, Small Meadows Farm, Gong Garden, and Garden Gate Greenhouse. Some of our other local farms such as Avid Farm, Roo Haven Farm, and Someday Maybe Farm offer sustainably grown beef, lamb, chicken, turkey, eggs, and cheeses. It is our mission to increase the awareness of and promote Chautauqua County’s family farms as well as businesses and products that are the foundation for our local economy.

What else do we offer?

Whether it is the weekly free pancake breakfast, market-sponsored musicians, concerts in the park, cooking demonstrations, tot yoga, children’s programming, an ice cream social or other activities, there seems to always be something for everyone. If you’re in the Western New York region come check out the Fredonia Farmers Market this weekend!

What’s being picked this week: Kale, Apples, Brussel Sprouts, Beets, Cabbage, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Tomatoes, Herbs, Peppers, Lima Beans, Eggplant, Potatoes, Sweet Corn, Squash, Blueberries, Pears, Raspberries, Okra, Collards

Recipes: A Fall Flavor Favorite (http://juliasalbum.com/2015/10/roasted-brussels-sprouts-cinnamon-butternut-squash-pecans-and-cranberries/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farmers Markets

5 Charts to Show the Importance of Farmers Markets in the Economy

Buying local at your farmers market with your EBT SNAP may not seem to have a large impact, but your purchases help the environment, local farmers, and the economy. Check out these 5 charts to learn how:

1) Farmers Markets stimulate local economies, preserve rural livelihoods, increase access to fresh food, and support healthy communities

 

Farmers MarketsSource: Farmers Market Coalition

2) And EBT SNAP benefits help employ farmers

 

Snap Benefits

Source: Fair Food Network

3) Buying local saves the environment and money

Buy Local

 

Source: eLocal.com

4)It creates a positive food chain reaction for our communities

 

Farmers Market Local Chain Reaction

Source: US Department of Agriculture

 

 

  • They impact our local communities for the better and we can help support them

 

 

Source: American Farmland Trust

 

Check out what is being picked this week*:

Collards, Beets, Cabbage, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Tomatoes, Herbs, Peppers, Lima Beans, Eggplant, Potatoes, Squash, Sweet Corn, Blueberries, Pears, Raspberries & Okra

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

 

Recipe of the Week:

Incorporate collards into an everyday favorite with this recipe!

Potatoes at Farmers market

One Potato, Two Potatoes, Bad Potato, Good?

Did you know that potatoes are actually good for you? Sadly, most people assume they aren’t good for them and with good reason. The truth is America’s obsession with junk food is to blame for potatoes getting a bad rap. According to the USDA/NASS approximately 65% of the potatoes consumed in the United States per year are in French Fry or Potato Chip form. Obviously, when you fry or process a potato and add fatty oils and high levels of sodium to them it’s going to do more harm than good.

Nutrition experts are trying to dispel the unhealthy potato myth by educating the public about the nutritional benefits of the potato. One medium baked potato gives us almost 30% or our daily-recommended value of both vitamin B6 and vitamin C. Potatoes are also high in both fiber and potassium which most of us do not get enough of on a daily basis. A baked potato is an excellent addition to a well-balanced meal if you go easy on the sodium and fatty toppings.

By now most of us are aware that we don’t have to sacrifice taste when it comes to eating healthy. Some alternative healthy toppings that go great on a baked potato are scallions, Greek yogurt, curry, tomato-pesto, salsa, low fat sour cream and chives. Can’t imagine your spud without butter and salt? Just remember less is more.

Don’t discard the skins. Eat them! Potato skins are packed with potassium, iron, and niacin. What does that mean for you? Potassium fuels your metabolism and assists in your muscle movement. Iron supports healthy red blood cells, which carry oxygen throughout your body. And Niacin or vitamin B3 is important for healthy new cell development and assists in recovering from stress.

Recently, the Institute of Medicine put white potatoes back on the eligibility list for the WIC program. They discovered that women and children weren’t meeting the recommended daily intake of starchy vegetables and potatoes are a simple and beneficial solution.

For all of you spud fans it’s time to bring the potato back into your diet. Remember, the potato on its own is healthy, just be aware of how it’s been prepared and what’s on top of it.

Check out what’s being picked this week*: Raspberries, Okra, Beets, Cabbage, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Herbs, Peppers, Lima Beans, Eggplant, Potatoes, Squash, Sweet Corn, Blueberries, Pears

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the Week:

Here’s a great way to load up your baked potato without the added fat and calories: Try this recipe

Photo Credit: Nick Saltmarsh Via Flickr Creative Commons

 

 

 

 

 

 

Farmers Market

What the Farmers Market Means to Me: A Farmer’s Point of View

I am up before the local morning news begins. I don’t commute in morning traffic. I don’t punch a time card. I don’t have a boss checking his watch when I arrive at work. I don’t show up at an office wearing expensive suits. I don’t have an IT department to call when something goes wrong in fact most of my co-workers walk on four legs.

I am a farmer. My family depends on me and you depend on me. No time for sick days or sleeping in. I don’t do my job for the pay or notoriety I do it to fulfill my passion for the land, growing, and agriculture. Without that passion I could not do it. My job is hard but I wouldn’t have it any other way.

One of my favorite days of the week is the day I show up at your local Farmers Market. I can’t wait to show you the beautiful beets, berries or broccoli I just harvested. I look forward to our conversations about what’s in season and the best way to prepare or preserve your produce.

In an era where fast food is prevalent I am proud to make you aware of nutritious and delicious options.

I chuckle when I hear the phrase farm to table. I’ve been doing that for years! I’m excited that our country is seeing the value in farm fresh food and that eating organic is trendy. I want you to be healthy. I want you to reap the benefits of my labor. I love the opportunity to present it to you personally.

I’m thankful that SNAP Benefits are accepted at local Farmers Markets. I believe everyone should have access to farm fresh food. I love witnessing all families enjoying the opportunity to spend a beautiful day at the market, watching children pick out the vegetables they will eat for dinner that night, and knowing that I have helped that family to eat good tasting and healthy local food.

If I’ve never met you at the Farmers Market I invite you to come see me soon. Between my fellow vendors and myself there is something for everyone. I can almost guarantee it will change your perception of grocery shopping and what it means to buy local. I look forward to meeting you and I thank you in advance for supporting me, your local farmer.

What’s being picked this week: Pears, Beets, Cabbage, Kale, Lettuce, Swiss Chard, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Herbs, Peppers, Lima Beans, Eggplant, Potatoes, Squash, Sweet Corn, Blueberries

Recipes: Looking for a healthy snack? Try these salsas! http://www.countryliving.com/food-drinks/a5299/homemade-salsa-recipes-cosmo/

Photo Credit: United Soybean Board Via Flickr Creative Commons

Local Farmers Market

4 Reasons to Support your Local Farmers Market

The NY Farmers Market EBT SNAP program has made it possible to bring home local nutritious food using your EBT SNAP benefits. Although it may be easier to use your EBT SNAP benefits card at your local supermarket, consider using your benefits at the farmers market. Here are four reasons why you should support your local farmers market. 

  1. The best of the best

At the farmers market, you will be able to select from the freshest and tastiest produce. Because the fruits and vegetables are local, they are able to fully ripen in the field unlike produce sold in the supermarket which may be picked before ripening and sit in storage. The farmers market offers a variety of produce which no supermarket can compare. Vegetables like red carrots and purple cauliflower are unique to farmers markets and will not be found at Wal-Mart.

  1. Protect the environment

When you purchase produce from the farmers market, you are helping the environment. Many do not realize there is a large environmental toll when you buy supermarket produce. According to the Center for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture, food travels an average of 1,500 miles to reach your kitchen table. Shipping food burns large amounts of fossil fuels which contributes to pollution. Whereas local produce travels much shorter distances. Buying local also gives you the benefit of knowing where your food came from.

  1. Farmers know best

It is unusual for supermarket employees to stand around the produce section offering cooking tips. At the farmers market, this is the norm. Farmers are passionate about food and because they grew it, are experts on how to cook it. Many offer advice about their produce accompanied with recipes. Not only will you leave the farmers market with fresh quality produce, you may also leave some great meal ideas and cooking tips.

  1. Support and connect with your community

The farmers market is more than a place to buy local, it is a community experience. Families come to enjoy the market, learn about fresh food, and connect with their community. Buying from the farmers market supports other families like yours. Family farmers are struggling to keep up with agribusiness and need community support. At the farmers market, farmers can get better return on their produce then from selling to distributors.

Talk to your friends and family! Share with them why it is important to shop and support our local farmers markets.

Check out what is being picked this week*:

Squash, Sweet Corn, Blueberries, Beets, Cabbage, Kale, Lettuce, Swiss Chard, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Herbs, Blackberries, Peppers, Eggplant & Potatoes

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the Week:

Trying to get your family to eat vegetables? Satisfy them with this simple dish.

 

 

Clinton Farmers Market

New York State Farmers Market Profile: Clinton Farmers Market

The Clinton Farmers Market is one of the largest markets in the Mohawk Valley region. It started twenty years ago with only a few vendors and now has over seventy! The location of the Clinton Farmers Market provides the picturesque farmers market setting for visitors. It’s bustling activity and occasional live music make it a great place to spend the day with family and friends. Learn more about about this spotlight farmers market and how you can use your EBT SNAP benefits.

When is it open?

The market runs on Thursdays from May 23 through October 6 from 10am – 4pm with extended hours on the third Thursday of each month from 10am – 6pm.

Where is it?

The market is located in the historic center of Clinton, NY on the Village Green. It central location is walking distance from many areas in town including the Clinton Central High School. A shuttle is provided by LutheranCare from Clinton Elementary School in July from 11 am-1pm. Hamilton College provides a Jitney Service from campus to the Village Green from 11am-1pm.

Does the market accept EBT SNAP Benefits?

The Clinton Farmers Market accepts EBT SNAP benefits. Look for the information tent at the market under the “Use Your SNAP Benefits Card to Get Tokens Here” banner. Shoppers can use their EBT SNAP benefits to purchase tokens at the manager’s booth. Tokens can be used farmers’ stands Your tokens can buy fruits, vegetables, plants that produce food, breads, meat, fish, poultry, dairy products, maple and honey products, seeds for plants that produce food, baked goods intended for home consumption, jams, sauces, and soups. 

What is for sale at the market?

The market has over 70 vendors from across the Mohawk Valley. They sell locally grown fruits, vegetables, fresh-cut and dried flowers, jams, jellies, meats and cheeses, maple syrup, honey, baked goods, and much more.  There is also a selection of handmade arts & crafts items including beautiful watercolor paintings, jewelry, clothing, and many other interesting items for sale.

What makes the Clinton Farmers Market so special?

The Clinton Farmers Market is a very community oriented and family friendly market. It welcomes all visitors, locally and those from out-of-town. It’s upbeat atmosphere and live music in the gazebo make it the perfect place to spend an afternoon. Clinton Farmers Market also offers free booth space to non-profit, charitable organizations to support the local Clinton community.

For more information on the Clinton Farmers Market, visit their website at http://clintonnychamber.org/farmers-market.html.

Check out what is being picked this week*:

Potatoes, Rhubarb, Beets, Cabbage, Kale, Lettuce, Swiss Chard, Onions, Snap Peas, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Cherries, Raspberries, Cucumbers, Tomatoes, Herbs, Blackberries & Peppers

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the week:

Try this healthy twist on a traditional Italian dish: Eggplant Parmesan!

Getting Kids To Eat Their Vegetables

Getting Your Kids to Eat Vegetable

As an adult, going to the farmers market and picking out fresh and local vegetables with your EBT SNAP benefits card is exciting. Unfortunately, your children may not be as enthused. If your child is a picky eater, it can be challenge to get them to eat healthy. Make the most of your farmers market produce and try these tips and recipes to get your kids to eat healthy foods!

  1. Get them cooking

If your children are involved in the food preparation process, from start to finish, they will be more inclined to eat the healthy dish. Take them to the farmers market and help them pick out the produce. Cooking together will not only be a quality experience but it will make your child feel involved and proud of the finished product.

  1. Pair vegetables with their favorite foods

Children will be more willing to try a new vegetable if it’s paired with their favorite food. Try adding vegetable toppings to a pizza or taco or mix in vegetables with a pasta dish. If your child is resistant, don’t give up. Your child’s taste preferences will change as they grow. It could be helpful to serve a familiar vegetable with a new one so your child will be more likely to eat them.

  1. Don’t force your child to eat vegetables

Although it is frustrating when your child will not eat their vegetables, it is not productive to yell or make ultimatums. DO NOT force your child to eat any food. This can cause emotional trauma surrounding the food and have them avoid eating it, even as adults. The best strategy is to ask them to eat small portions of the food to try, not clean their plate.

  1. Put them everywhere

When children are hungry, they usually pick what is easy and accessible. Your job as a parent is to make fruits and vegetables reachable snacks. Cut them up and put them in containers on low shelves in the fridge. If healthy snacks are already cut and ready to eat, your children will be more likely to choose them. Also, have snack-sized dips like hummus or ranch available to pair with raw vegetables.

  1. Set a good example

Children mimic their parents’ behavior. If they see you eating healthy foods, they will eat them as well. Eat the foods you are asking them to eat and be a role model for them. Teach them about healthy foods and nutrition and they will most likely adopt your ways.

If none of these tips work on your picky eater, try hiding vegetables in plain sight. Check out this website with over 100+ recipes kids will enjoy but secretly contain vegetables.

Check out what is being picked this week*:

Tomatoes, Herbs, Blackberries, Peppers, Lima Beans, Rhubarb, Beets, Cabbage, Kale, Lettuce, Swiss Chard, Onions, Snap Peas, Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Cherries, Raspberries & Cucumbers

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the Week:

If your child is a chicken nugget fanatic, try this recipe for veggie nuggets. It may just get them to eat their vegetables.

Grilling Vegetables

Summer Time is Grilling Time: Tips to Grill Vegetables to Perfection

Once you’ve purchased your locally grown vegetables with your EBT SNAP card, the question becomes how should you cook them? The best way to eat vegetables in the summer is to grill them. Not only can you enjoy the summer weather and cook outside, but it can be done in less than 30 minutes. To grill to perfection this summer follow these tips:

  1. Know them.

Some vegetables are grown for the grill, while others do not fare so well. It is important to know which vegetables are best for the grill and how long they take to cook. Asparagus, corn, eggplant, mushrooms, peppers, onions and cabbage are great grilling vegetables. Squash, tomatoes, potatoes, zucchini, and even romaine work well on the grill as well but beware of their cooking times. Denser vegetables like potatoes will take much longer where tomatoes grill quickly. Make sure to avoid grilling cucumbers, celery, and most leafy greens. Their high water content makes them hard to grill.

  1. Coat them.

When grilling vegetables, it is important to always coat them in cooking oil or marinade. Without oil, the vegetables will dry up when heated. Before grilling, make sure to toss your vegetables lightly in cooking oil or marinade and add some seasoning for flavor. Avoid adding too much because dripping oil can cause flare-ups and off flavors. The correct amount of cooking oil or marinade will keep your vegetables tender and help the seasoning stick.

  1. Cut them.

To minimize grill time, you want to make sure your vegetables have the most surface area touching the grill. Cut your larger vegetables in decent-sized chunks to maximize surface area. You don’t want to cut them too small or they will fall through the grill. Cutting your vegetables to similar thicknesses will also help them cook more evenly. Another tip to cooking vegetables more evenly is to separate your dense and delicate vegetables. Individually, sear each grouping over high heat then move them to a cooler part of the grill to finish cooking.

  1. Kabob them.

Sometimes you can’t cut your vegetables into decent-sized pieces. Small vegetables like cherry tomatoes are prone to rolling around on the grill. To prevent them from falling, use a skewer and make kabobs with other small vegetables. Smaller pieces cook must faster than larger pieces on the grill. Placing your vegetables on a skewer is the best way to grill vegetables quick.

  1. Place them.

If your vegetables are too big for a skewer, use a grilling pan. A grilling pan is the perfect tool to keep vegetables from burning. Separate your dense and delicate vegetables in individual pans to account for varying cooking times. Watch each pan closely until the desired tenderness is reached. Remember, denser vegetables will take much longer to cook. If you do not have a grilling pan, aluminum foil can work as well to form small grilling baskets.

Now you’re ready to get grilling! Put your grilling skills to the test and try this recipe for Balsamic Grilled Vegetable Salad.

—-

Check out what is being picked this week*:

Broccoli, Beans, Zucchini, Cherries, Raspberries, Rhubarb, Beets, Cabbage, Cucumbers, Kale, Lettuce, Swiss Chard, Scallions & Snap Peas

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the week:

Cherries are more than an Ice Cream Sundae Topper. Check out this cherry-filled sweet summer snack!

 

 

 

Broome County Farmers Market Poster

New York State Farmers Market Profile: Broome County Regional Farmers Market

 

The Otsiningo Park Farmers Market in Binghamton, NY has been the “go-to” farmers market in the Southern Tier since 2007. Due to the growing popularity of the market in the region and its accessibility to farmers in the state, Binghamton was the ideal location to establish a regional farmers market. After years of planning, the Broome County Regional Farmers Market will open Saturday, June 25! Get the need-to-know facts about this new farmers market and how you can use your EBT SNAP benefits.

What is it? The Broome County Regional Farmers Market is a 6,700 square-foot indoor farmers market. The market will serve as a gathering place for the Broome County community and visitors to enjoy local products and connect with local farmers.

When does it open? The Broome County Farmers Market will open on Saturday, June 25. Because it is an indoor facility, the market will be open year-round on Saturdays from 9am-1pm. Look out for the Tuesday night market and Sunday antiques and flea market which will be coming soon!

Where is it? The Broome County Regional Farmers Market is located on the Cornell Cooperative Extension in Broome County on 840 Upper Front Street in Binghamton, NY.

 Does the market accept EBT SNAP Benefits? Yes! EBT SNAP benefits can be used at the Broome County Regional Farmers Market. Simply swipe your EBT SNAP card with the market manager and receive $1 tokens which can redeemed at vendor stands. The tokens can be used to purchase items under EBT requirements (non-prepared, non-heated foods.)

What is happening on July 16th?  Even though they opened on June 25, the Grand Opening Celebration for the Broome County Regional Farmers Market will be held on Saturday, July 16. The event will have live music, food trucks, fun for the kids, access to the Cutler Garden, face painting, a balloon artist and recipe tastings. Mark your calendar!

What do the vendors sell? The Broome County Regional Farmers Market offers the best products in the Southern Tier. The products range from locally-grown fruits, vegetables, herbs and spices to locally-raised meat, dairy and eggs to breads, baked goods, honey, jams, jellies, maple syrups and coffee to potted plants, cut flowers, jewelry, home supplies, and more!

Will Otsiningo Park Farmers Market remain open? The Otsiningo Park Farmers Market will transition into the Broome County Farmers Market in June and will close. Almost all of the farmers from the Otsiningo Park Farmers Market will be moving over to the Broome County Regional Farmers Market.

For more information on the Broome County Regional Farmers Market, visit their website at http://www.bcregionalmkt.com/.

 

 

—-

 

Check out what is being picked this week*:

Peas, Spinach, Strawberries, Rhubarb, Beets, Cabbage, Kale, Lettuce, Swiss Chard & Snap Peas

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

 

 

Recipe of the week:

Stir up your vegetables with some extra flavor in this recipe for Asparagus and Peas with Warm Tarragon Vinaigrette.