Category Archives: Cauliflower

morningside park farmer's market

Morningside Park Farmers’ Market

morningside park farmer's marketWhen is the market open? Market open Saturdays, 9:00AM – 4:00PM, 05/06 – 12/30

Where is the market located? 110th St. & Manhattan Ave., New York, NY

Does the market accept EBT SNAP benefits?  Yes, and to encourage you to use your SNAP card, we offer Health Bucks. Health Bucks are $2 coupons that you receive for every $5 you spend from your SNAP card; you can use the health bucks to buy more fresh fruits and vegetables at the farmers’ market.

What do the vendors sell? Vendors offer a wide variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, fish, meats, dairy; baked goods, specialty foods and plants and flowers; jams & jelly, salad dressings, sauces & salsa, olive oil, chutneys, frozen soups, chocolate, pickles as well as prepared ethnic foods.

For more information about Morningside Park Farmers’ Market, please visit the website at:  http://downtoearthmarkets.com/markets?region=manhattan&market=Morningside+Park+Farmers+Market and their Facebook page at: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Morningside-Park-Farmers-Market/118800614848796

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Check out what is being picked this week*:

italian peppers, red/yellow bell peppers, bell peppers, slicing tomatoes, heirloom tomatoes, cherry tomatoes, zucchini squash, summer squash, slicing cucumbers, patty pan squash, okra, hot peppers, purple eggplant, tomatillo, greenhouse tomatoes, pickling cucumbers, corn, plum tomatoes, braising greens, spinach, salad mixes, head lettuce, leaf lettuce, chard, kale, asian greens, arugula, broccoli raab, collards, escarole, amaranth/calaloo, dandelion, mustard greens, asparagus, thyme, sage, parsley, mint, dill, cilantro, basil, rosemary, oregano, lavender, raspberries, currants, gooseberries, strawberries, cantaloupe, watermelon, blueberries, plums, peaches, nectarines, sweet cherries, apricots, celery, fennel, leeks, onions, scallions, string beans, italian flat beans, shell peas, snap peas, garlic, snow peas, shallots, haricovert, red beets, carrots, parsnips, french radish, radish, rutabaga, purple top turnip, japanese turnip, bok choy, golden beets, potatoes, cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, chioggia beets, black radish, specialty carrots, fingerling potatoes, savoy cabbage, napa cabbage

 

Recipe of the week: Yellow Summer Squash in the Oven

This easy recipe from Peg at www.allrecipes.com is easy and quick to prepare!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Freezing Fruit

How to Stockpile Your Produce Without the Hassle of Canning

With the outdoor farmers market season coming to an end, everyone is looking for ways to stockpile their fresh produce. To maximize your SNAP EBT benefits and utilize your farmers market produce several months from now, try preserving your produce!

The most traditional way to preserve your produce is by canning. Canning, however, can be very difficult for beginners and can be a long and tedious process. Here are three stress-free alternatives to canning that guarantee your produce’s freshness long after harvest.

  1. Freezing

Freezing is a great alternative to making jam and canning if you want your produce to be accessible in the middle of the winter. You also can do it easily in your own home with a standard freezer. You can freeze fresh fruit, vegetables, and even herbs in olive oil in an ice cube tray. Full recipes here:

How to Freeze Fresh Fruit, How to Freeze Zucchini, How to Freeze Fresh Herbs in Olive Oil

  1. Drying

Drying is another canning alternative that can preserve your best fruit. Although drying typically involves a dehydrator, it can easily be done in your own oven. Try drying your own fruit for your trail mix this fall. Full recipe here: How to Dry Fruit Without a Dehydrator

  1. Jamming

Although jamming is still done in a can, it is a much simpler process. Making jams and preserves is a great way to reuse extra fruit and can also double as a great gift. The difference between jams and preserves comes from how they are made. Jams use mashed up fruit whereas preserves use chunks of whole fruit. Full recipe here: How to Make Jams and Preserves

Check out what’s being picked this week*: Pumpkin, Cauliflower, Beets, Cabbage, Broccoli, Beans, Peppers, Eggplant, Potatoes, Winter Squash, Onions, Raspberries & Collards

*Availability will vary by market due to differences in growing zones.

Recipe of the Week:

Cozy up this fall with this seasonal soup recipe!